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Make older programs run on Windows 7

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Most programs written for Windows Vista also work Windows 7, but some older programs might run poorly or not at all. If a program written for an earlier version of Windows doesn't run correctly, you can try changing the compatibility settings for the program, either manually or by using the Program Compatibility troubleshooter.

To run the Program Compatibility troubleshooter
  1. Open the Program Compatibility troubleshooter by clicking the Start button and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type troubleshooter, and then click Troubleshooting. Under Programs, click Run programs made for previous versions of Windows.
  2. Follow the instructions in the troubleshooter.
  3. If you cannot install a program, insert the installation disc for the program and, using the troubleshooter, browse to the program's setup file, usually called Setup.exe, Install.exe, or something similar. The troubleshooter is not designed to work on programs that have an .msi file name extension.
Tip
 You can also open the Program Compatibility troubleshooter by right-clicking a program's icon or shortcut and then clicking Troubleshoot compatibility.

This information was provided by: Microsoft

Last edit: by LZ2NJG



If you find this site helpful, please try to upload something new (radio programming software or manuals/circuit diagrams etc.) and make someone else happy too. Please consider donating and help pay the bills, thank you.
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i would like to add that some older dos based programming software can be run in a program called dos box i have used it on several pieces of software good luck
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wookie said

i would like to add that some older dos based programming software can be run in a program called dos box i have used it on several pieces of software good luck
I agree with you Wookie, DOSBox offers very good compatibility with old DOS programs when set up correctly.

A quick note I made here for the M100 RSS should be a useful starting point for new DOSBox users.

You must keep in mind that DOS RSS's are looking for real COM ports, not USB ports.

I must get around to writing a full tutorial so, if anyone has had problems with DOSBox, please create a new forum topic and I'll address these issues in the article.

Nick
 


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I  have had a lot of success with virtual machines using VMware. There is a free version  that can be downloaded. Can run just about any OS in a virtual machine running in win7 (or anything else). It will allow the use of both real com ports and USB com ports.
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VK6ZRW said

I  have had a lot of success with virtual machines using VMware. There is a free version  that can be downloaded. Can run just about any OS in a virtual machine running in win7 (or anything else). It will allow the use of both real com ports and USB com ports.

But my virtual machines on VMware dont work with rial com port.
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Alexcoldax said

VK6ZRW said

I  have had a lot of success with virtual machines using VMware. There is a free version  that can be downloaded. Can run just about any OS in a virtual machine running in win7 (or anything else). It will allow the use of both real com ports and USB com ports.
But my virtual machines on VMware dont work with rial com port.
Hi AlexcoIdax,

I use the (free) Oracle VirtualBox and found this tutorial on virtualbox.org by Jorgensen very helpful, maybe there is something that will point you in the right direction:


How to add a physical serial port.
In Guest Settings for Serial Ports set as follow
Port1: Checked
Port Number: COM1
Port Mode: Host Device
Windows Host:
Port/File Path: COM1:
Note the colon in COM1: (not semicolon). I have experienced the guest could become unstable without it.
For a host port number higher than 9, the naming \.\comX where X is the port number, is required. This can also be used for a one digit port number.
Linux Host:
Port/File Path: /dev/ttyS1
For other COM port than 1 replace the digit with port number.

Also remember the IRQ and I/O Port settings.
If the guest needs to see another port than COM1, change the Port Number to the requested port.
If using a user defined IRQ for the guest, IO APIC may have to be enabled.

Save the settings and start the guest.

Open the Device Manager in the guest and go to the Ports (COM & LPT) section.
If you see a COM3 port with a yellow warning icon skip the following sections.

XP:
Open Add Hardware from the Control Panel.
After searching for hardware select ‘Yes, I have already connected the hardware’ and Next.
Go to the bottom and select ‘Add a new hardware device’
Select ‘Install the hardware that I manually select from a list’
Select ‘Ports (COM & LPT)’
Select ‘Communication Port’ from Standard port types.
Continue with Next until finished.
WIN7:
From the Action menu select Add legacy hardware.
Select Next, ‘Install the hardware that I manually select from a list’ and Next
Select ‘Ports (COM & LPT)’ and Next
Select ‘Communication Port’ from Standard port types.
Continue with Next and Finish.

In the Device Manager you should now see the COM3 port with a yellow warning icon.

Open Properties for the COM3 port.
Select Advanced from Port Settings.
Choose COM1 from the ‘COM Port Number’ (Ignore possible 'In Use')
In the Resources tab select ‘Set Configuration Manually’ if you see it.
In Windows 7 uncheck ‘Use automatic settings’
Select the configuration that corresponds to the VirtualBox settings as noted – likely configuration 0000.
Close the box and you should be asked to reboot.
After reboot the COM1 port should now be working.

How to add an USB serial port.
Important: Depending on version 'VirtualBox Extension Pack' must be installed to use an USB serial adapter.

You have the choice of installing the device USB driver on the host or cancel this installation, but the VirtualBox's host routing must be installed when the device is accessed for the first time in the guest.

In guest Settings for USB set as follow
Enable USB Controller: Checked
Enable USB 2.0: Checked
Add the driver (e.g. FTDI USB <-> Serial)

Save the settings and start the guest.

From the menu or status bar of VirtualBox frame check the Serial Port in the USB section.
Install the USB driver in the guest - I have found it is a good idea to restart the guest after the host routing is done and before the driver installation. If still a problem with the USB initializing the following procedure usually will do the job link.

In the guest the port number can be changed in the Device Manager, as well as settings for buffers, timers, etc.

Credit: jorgensen

 


If you find this site helpful, please try to upload something new (radio programming software or manuals/circuit diagrams etc.) and make someone else happy too. Please consider donating and help pay the bills, thank you.
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Thank you , I will try
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I'm going to have to give this a try
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masonb said

I'm going to have to give this a try

Please do report back on your success or otherwise.

Thanks

Nick


If you find this site helpful, please try to upload something new (radio programming software or manuals/circuit diagrams etc.) and make someone else happy too. Please consider donating and help pay the bills, thank you.
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After many go around I just found it easier and safer to pick up an OLD think pad has a true serial connector and use it exclusively on older radios.  
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Great Information all. I'm still a fanatic of DOS Shell where they had a great menu data base of editing the .list and few others to get the Menu.exe working if anyone remembers DOS Shell back in 1995. :)
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Keep in mind ladies and Gentlemen that on windows 7 Compatibility troubleshooter should work, however will not work with windows 10. Any software that's needing DOS and the Com Ports is proprietary. It's just like that especially with most of the main manufacturers of RSS for all brands. If your laptop has the Com Port Physically, even if you have win 7 should work. Word of thought 73's to all
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i can also confirm that dosbox works great with windows 7 32 bit. I have been able to program some ht1000s with dosbox with a rib and cable using a toughbook cf30 with a real serial port. it works great. 
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With any .exe windows file that won't run properly, I usually right click on the .exe file and choose properties.

Once in the Properties dialog, Click on the Compatibility tab. Then "Run this program compatible for" then choose the right operating system and then click "Apply" and "Ok".

You should then be able to launch the .exe file without any issues.

I hope this helped! 
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Thanks
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Prefiro montar um pendrive com boot for dos e criar um disco completo com todos os softwares e ferramentas compatíveis que desejo utilizar nesse ambiente, pois é mais seguro, estável e otimizado.
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I normally use virtual box to install older operating systems eg windows 7 or XP and I use free dos running in virtual box for DOS based programmes
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LZ2NJG said

Most programs written for Windows Vista also work Windows 7, but some older programs might run poorly or not at all. If a program written for an earlier version of Windows doesn't run correctly, you can try changing the compatibility settings for the program, either manually or by using the Program Compatibility troubleshooter.

To run the Program Compatibility troubleshooter
  1. Open the Program Compatibility troubleshooter by clicking the Start button and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type troubleshooter, and then click Troubleshooting. Under Programs, click Run programs made for previous versions of Windows.
  2. Follow the instructions in the troubleshooter.
  3. If you cannot install a program, insert the installation disc for the program and, using the troubleshooter, browse to the program's setup file, usually called Setup.exe, Install.exe, or something similar. The troubleshooter is not designed to work on programs that have an .msi file name extension.
Tip
 You can also open the Program Compatibility troubleshooter by right-clicking a program's icon or shortcut and then clicking Troubleshoot compatibility.

This information was provided by: Microsoft

 :thumbs:
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You could also install on a second hard and setup the system as dual boot
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